Mapping Pollution in India

Photo credit: Alfred Palmer / Foter.com / Public domain

Pollution is an inevitable by-product of industrial growth. It is important, however, to understand the quantity of pollution created by an industrial area and the subsequent impact on the local environment and population. The Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), in association with IIT-Delhi, has devised a way to rationalize the amount of pollution in an area, called the Comprehensive Environmental Pollution Index (CEPI).

CEPI takes into account the presence of toxins, the scale of industrial activity, the concentration of  pollutants, the impact on people and the eco-geology, the level of exposure and the risk to sensitive receptors. These factors are classified into pollutant, pathway and receptor. Based on the score obtained by the area in the three factors, the index is calculated to determine the amount pollution in that area. This index is then used as a basis for further action to be taken to rein in the problematic areas and mitigate further damage.

The Government of India released the results of this study over three iterations (2009, 2011 and 2013) in the public domain. This dataset contains information about 43 critically polluted areas in India. I superimposed the results of this study upon location and created an interactive map to better understand the extent of the study.

pollution_map
Map of the CEPI scores of industrial sectors across India. The markers in red indicate the presence of a moratorium in the area, while the blue markers indicate that the moratorium has been lifted.

You can check out the map here: http://mapyogi.com/apps/pollution/

To create the basemap, I used the OpenStreetMap customization tools provided by Mapbox. LeafletJS was used to overlay the data on the basemap and provide interactivity. Twitter Bootstrap was used to make the map and the web page responsive.

The CEPI is a move in the right direction. Let’s hope that this study is consistently improved upon in the future, to give some hope of preserving our rapidly deteriorating environment.

You can know more about CEPI, CPCB and the data released here:

  1. http://cpcb.nic.in/divisionsofheadoffice/ess/NewItem_152_Final-Book_2.pdf
  2. http://cpcb.nic.in/
  3. http://data.gov.in/dataset/details-comprehensive-environmental-pollution-index-cepi-scores-and-status-moratorium-critic
  4. http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=59156
Advertisements

Why you should be excited about the New Google Maps

Last week,  Google released a preview version of the new version of Google Maps for the desktop. I requested an invite as soon as I could and got it a couple of days ago. I’ve written this post based on the first look.

The new Google Maps has been redesigned inside and out. The most apparent change is the cartography. Marker and feature colours have changed and it’s fairly apparent that a lot of work went into making the map presentable, compared to the Spartan nature of the ‘old’ Google Maps. (The gradient used for water bodies is my personal favourite.)

The interface has changed. The old clumsy sidebar is gone and replaced with a series of cards, which is a good thing. The new UI allows for an unobstructed view of the map, but you know where to find the search bar if you need it. A bar at the bottom shows a carousel of thumbnails of photos taken in and around the location you are currently viewing.

The new Google Maps interface
The new Google Maps interface
The old Google Maps interface
The old Google Maps interface
Google Maps photo carousel
Google Maps photo carousel

The search feature has been revamped. Searching for a place shows a card which has the name and address of the place, directions and either street view or a photo of the place. You can now also have custom searches, which will be saved in case you want to search for the same thing again. For example, a search for ‘thai food, pune’ shows all of the restaurants in Pune that serve Thai cuisine. Nifty! You can click on one of the markers to get more details about the place and directions on how to get there.

Places that serve Thai cuisine in Pune
Places that serve Thai cuisine in Pune
Clicking on a marker shows a cards containing the name, address and photos of the place.
Clicking on a marker shows a cards containing the name, address and photos of the place.

If you opt to ask for directions, it shows me a couple of cards that replace the search card. The marker is automatically entered into the ‘B’ (destination) box. You can either manually enter an address in the ‘A’ (source)  box or choose from you home or work address, in case  you have set them. You get to choose whether you want directions for driving/walking/cycling/flying (in case the source and destination have flights connecting them) or using public transport.

Driving route and directions in the new Google Maps
Driving route and directions in the new Google Maps
Live traffic in the city of Pune
Live traffic in the city of Pune

If you choose driving instructions, you are shown a series of stack cards with step-by-step driving instructions. You can also choose to turn on the traffic view if you don’t want to get stuck in a jam.

If you frequently rely on public transport for getting to places, Google will make you very happy. The public transport option shows you what bus to get on at what stop, where do you need to change, where to get off and how long the journey would take. You also get the times at which the bus runs, the frequency of the bus and alternate routes that you can take. If your city has a train/metro service, you can also get what combination to take to reach the destination quickly.

Bus routes in the new Google Maps
Bus routes in the new Google Maps

If your appetite is whetted, you can request for an invite to the preview here.